Tuesday, 11 December 2012 21:47

Tolerating the Extremes of Southeast Texas

Written by  Steve Doherty
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A photograph of Linda Dellandre painting with pastels inside her kayak. Linda's husband, William Dellandre, took the photograph with a long-view lens on his camera. A photograph of Linda Dellandre painting with pastels inside her kayak. Linda's husband, William Dellandre, took the photograph with a long-view lens on his camera.



Texas pastel painter Linda Dellandre reports that extreme heat, high humidity, and alligators can be just as challenging to a plein air painter as snow, wind, or rain.

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Linda Dellandre's two containers of pastels that she takes in her kayak

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"First Light at the Pond," by Linda Dellandre, pastel, 9 x 12 in.
 
"I live in Montgomery, Texas, and while many don't think that is extreme territory to plein air paint, there are dangers and difficulties," says Linda Dellandre. "I often navigate the nearby lakes, marshes, and bayous by kayak with all my pastel painting supplies, a chair, and an umbrella tucked inside. I put all the bits of dark- and medium-value pastels in one container and all the light-value sticks in another, and I attach sheets of Kitty Wallis paper on a clipboard. I don't bring an easel, but my chair and umbrella are essential for blocking the intense sunlight and being comfortable while painting. I wear a bathing suit (in case the kayak tips over) and put a towel over my knees and legs against exposure."

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"Dreamspot," by Linda Dellandre, pastel, 10 x 8 in.

Dellandre goes on, "I've also painted after hiking down to the Havasupai Falls in Arizona, and I enjoyed a residency in plein air painting in France. It's all part of the adventure of painting directly from nature." For more information, visit www.lindadellandre.com.