image via Dorset ECHO

You likely wouldn’t be surprised if I told you that outdoor painting is a worldwide phenomenon. We spend a lot of time detailing the amazing events, exhibitions, and festivals here at home, so why not take a brief moment to see what’s happening across the pond?

A group of 20 local artists from Dorchester, England, were recently given free access to the area’s sculpture garden to show off their plein air skills in a variety of media. The small event, called “Sculpture by the Lakes,” not only gave artists the opportunity to paint a beautiful location, but also afforded visitors the chance to see their local creatives at work — and possibly walk home with a painting of their own.

image via Dorset ECHO

According to the Dorset ECHO, the rain held off just long enough for artists to capture a glowing summer light across the lakes, gardens, and sculptures in the park. The park is truly plein air paradise, featuring 26 acres of glorious English countryside. In addition to the lakes, the grounds feature delicately manicured gardens, ponds, rivers, and more.

image via Dorset ECHO
image via Dorset ECHO

The park has planned another paint-out event for September 9. To learn more, visit the Dorset ECHO or Sculpture by the Lakes.

This article was featured in PleinAir Today, a weekly e-newsletter from PleinAir magazine. To start receiving PleinAir Today for free, click here.

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Editor PleinAir Today, Andrew Webster
Andrew Webster is the Editor of Plein Air Today and works as an editorial and creative marketing assistant for Streamline Publishing. Andrew graduated from The University of North Carolina at Asheville with a B.A. in Art History and Ceramics. He then moved on to the University of Oregon, where he completed an M.A. in Art History. Studying under scholar Kathleen Nicholson, he completed a thesis project that investigated the peculiar practice of embedded self-portraiture within Christian imagery during the 15th and early 16th centuries in Italy.

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