The new Nitram Charcoal factory!

On June 12, 2016, a devastating fire ripped through and destroyed the Nitram Charcoal factory. Although the bad news continued after the destruction, good news has begun to surface, including what we have to report here.

Last summer we reported on a catastrophic fire that destroyed the factory where Nitram Charcoals produced its well-known fine drawing charcoals. Unfortunately, a mix-up revealed that the facility was not insured, and it was a total loss for the company.

The remains of the Nitram Charcoal factory on June 12, 2016

To get back on their feet, Nitram began a GoFundMe campaign, which is still open for donations today. However, a recent company newsletter revealed some fantastic news: Nitram’s new factory has opened. “The new factory is actually a mirror image of the previous one and is located directly across the lane,” says Jerzy Niedojadlo of Nitram Arts Inc. “Fortunately, the oven was completely unharmed; a wall collapsed over the oven and protected it. It worked perfectly at the first start-up.”

Niedojadlo continues, “It took nine months from the first to start producing again. I want to thank all the artists, retailers, distributors and well wishers from around the world for their support. It really helped us through the recovery process.”

We’re happy to see a great art supply company back on its feet!

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Editor PleinAir Today, Andrew Webster
Andrew Webster is the Editor of Plein Air Today and works as an editorial and creative marketing assistant for Streamline Publishing. Andrew graduated from The University of North Carolina at Asheville with a B.A. in Art History and Ceramics. He then moved on to the University of Oregon, where he completed an M.A. in Art History. Studying under scholar Kathleen Nicholson, he completed a thesis project that investigated the peculiar practice of embedded self-portraiture within Christian imagery during the 15th and early 16th centuries in Italy.

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