Rick Wilson, “Darkness at the Edge of Town,” oil on mastonite, 12 x 16 inches

Mounted in 2016, “The Nature of Art: Painted Parks” by Indiana artist Rick Wilson and the Richmond Art Museum was recently recognized by the Indiana Historical Society, winning this state-wide honor.

From May 2016 through July 2016, the Richmond Art Museum and artist Rick Wilson exhibited 70 paintings that documented Indiana’s 24 state parks and eight reservoirs. The show was a remarkable display and homage to the Hoosier State’s ecological, biological, and geographical diversity through the creative vision of one of the state’s most accomplished artists. The exhibition broke records for opening attendance and sales dollars for the museum. What’s more, five additional exhibitions followed around the state, with educational programs held at each new venue.

Rick Wilson, “Upper Catarac Falls,” oil, 11 x 14 inches

Now, the artist and museum have been recognized with the 2017 Bicentennial Collaborative Project Award. Presented on November 6, the award recognizes an event or history project implemented in 2016. An official Indiana Bicentennial Legacy Project, the exhibition merged two aspects of Indiana — the arts and the environment — and raised awareness for efforts to preserve, protect, and enjoy the state’s green spaces, according to the release.

To learn more, visit here.

This article was featured in PleinAir Today, a weekly e-newsletter from PleinAir magazine. To start receiving PleinAir Today for free, click here.

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Editor PleinAir Today, Andrew Webster
Andrew Webster is the Editor of Plein Air Today and works as an editorial and creative marketing assistant for Streamline Publishing. Andrew graduated from The University of North Carolina at Asheville with a B.A. in Art History and Ceramics. He then moved on to the University of Oregon, where he completed an M.A. in Art History. Studying under scholar Kathleen Nicholson, he completed a thesis project that investigated the peculiar practice of embedded self-portraiture within Christian imagery during the 15th and early 16th centuries in Italy.

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